Make Your Own: A Visual Essay

The last few months have been nuts, frankly. We’ve made 80 Boxes, and are sending about 40 of them to our Make Your Own Museum in a Box pilots, all over the world (every continent except Antartica!?!). We’ve upgraded the Box to V1.2 to incorporate a new amp/sound design, and a much less expensive RFID reader. That’s good.

I really liked what our amp-soldering helper, Thomas Butler, said back in November:

Getting into ‘mass’ hand manufacturing of amp boards for @_museuminabox @DoESLiverpool.

80 boxes is a lot. The most we’ve ever made or had. Now we even have inventory (but even that’s disappearing!). It’s great. Next step is to figure out how to make them even more quickly, and even more cost-effectively.

Thank You

  • The magnificent and thorough Thibaut Evrard, who did the lion’s share of construction
  • Irfan & Noufal at Hamon, who have coded up the web app our pilots will need to configure their collections & boxes
  • Tom Armitage, who designed our new Amp, nicknamed “Boomer”
  • Amy Haigh, who helped kick off the Make Your Own kit design process
  • Tom Butler, who soldered all Tom A’s amps in quick smart time
  • Takako Copeland, who made our lovely WiFi cards by hand at the London Centre for Book Arts
  • Paul Beech and the crew at Pimoroni who sold us lots of hardware, but also did tons of laser-cutting for us
  • The 30 or so suppliers on our bill of materials, and of course
  • Adrian McEwen and Charlie Cattel-Killick who continue to ride on this crazy horse to find out where she’s going.

 Making Boxes

Pilots Getting Started

The boxes are making their way out into the world now. We’d post more, but there’s only £19 in the account. (Not for long. It’ll be fine.)

Our first branded hardware!

Over the past nine months or so, we’ve been able to show Museum in a Box to hundreds of people, either in our office or at events, and the response has been fantastic.

It’s also been ongoing informal user research, and we’ve had the chance to watch people figure out how to use it. We’ve varied our description of the mechanics and amount of setup, and observed (very casually) little sticking points. One of the main things we noticed is that it wasn’t clear when the Brain was ready to go. The Raspberry Pi 2 takes a while to start up and get ready to read an object, about 30 seconds, actually. So, we’ve added a physical progress bar to the box to help people know when it’s ready. It even says READY!

Adrian soldered the first version, which you can see here. We also adjusted the layout of the box to simplify it a bit. All you really need to know about is power, volume and when it’s ready.

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And we put a BIG GREEN LIGHT at the end, which is fun.

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I’ve also been thinking about what kind of simple instructions we’ll need to include in a box that doesn’t have us driving it. Hopefully something like this, with just three steps would be good.

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And then, Adrian took a very exciting step and ordered us our very own Printed Circuit Board (PCB) to drive the progress bar from now on.

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It’s possible I’m overexcited about the progress bar, but, I love it!